July 16, 2019, 04:08:19 PM

Author Topic: The Highly Calibrated Wizard  (Read 7802 times)

The Dude

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The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« on: August 31, 2013, 01:18:26 AM »
The Highly Calibrated Wizard

When I first started playing Mage Wars, I instantly gravitated to the Wizard. Why? Not because I had heard it was the best, not because of the abilities. I went with the wizard because I had heard that it was the hardest to play. That’s the only reason. I love a thought provoking challenge, and the Wizard happened to be it. So, I tried out the pre-constructed books. And he was difficult, but not terribly so. As well, I didn’t much care for the mana denial aspect that was thrown in. So, I built my own book. And how did it do?

Terrible. This book was just bad. Why? Because I tried to play aggressive solo Fire Wizard. I thought that not having to cast creatures and just kiting was enough to win the game. It was not. Turns out creatures are kind of a good thing… I was finally able to make him work, but it was when I included creatures that the book became halfway decent. And then Forcemaster vs. Warlord came out and dropped a huge boulder on everyone’s head.

I didn’t even bother with the Forcemaster, or the Warlord. I just wanted to build a Stone Wizard. I had seen these awesome attack spells and I figured that they would go great in the wizard. As well, you have these awesome Iron golems that can just do so much work and are nigh impossible to kill. So the book started out much more controlling. It won, and it did a great job at winning, but it lost to more aggressive decks. How could I fix that? Well, I didn’t, for a long time. And then I came across a “Pop sniper” strategy, which was basically to drop an Archer’s Watchtower followed by a Grimson Deadeye, Sniper and smash faces. Many faces. This actually is the shell of the book, and what makes it work so well. So, without further ado, I’m going to list the book and then go through the different strategies this book can provide.

4 Hurl Boulder (8)
1 Hail of Stone (2)
1 Arc Lightning (2)
2 Iron Golem (6)
1 Grimson Deadeye, Sniper (8)
1 Steelclaw Grizzly (8)
1 Sunfire Amulet (4)
1 Elemental Cloak (1)
1 Mage Wand (2)
1 Dragonscale Hauberk (2)
1 Regrowth Belt (2)
1 Leather Boots (1)
1 Leather Gloves (1)
1 Battle Forge (4)
1 Wall of Steel (2)
1 Wizard’s Tower (2)
2 Mana Crystal (2)
1 Wall of Thorns (1)
1 Archer’s Watchtower (2)
3 Tanglevine (6)
1 Block (2)
2 Jinx (2)
1 Teleport Trap (1)
2 Nullify (2)
1 Turn to Stone (3)
1 Hawkeye (2)
1 Eagle Wings (4)
1 Magebane (2)
1 Ghoul Rot (4)
1 Rouse the Beast (2)
2 Sniper Shot (2)
2 Dissolve (4)
1 Purge Magic (3)
2 Dispel (2)
2 Charge (4)
2 Seeking Dispel (2)
1 Force Push (2)
2 Battle Fury (4)
4 Teleport (8)

This is all for a total of 120 points. Now, how does the book work? It may seem like just a bunch of random spells thrown together with little to no thought behind them, but in reality, there is a very subtle cohesiveness that can only be found once we dig deeper than the surface. Let’s start with the beginning, shall we?

The Opener:
Every single game, under almost every single circumstance, your first two rounds are going to be the same. You are going to sprint to the near center with your full action, and then quickcast Archer’s Watchtower for 4 mana. For those of you who may not know what “Near center” means, look at a Mage Wars board. Look at where your starting corner is. Now, go up one zone. After that, go to the left one zone. Congrats! You’ve made it to the Near Center. It’s called this because there is no exact “center” of the board, only two that go “near” the center.

In any case, during the second round, you are going to cast Grimson Deadeye followed by a rouse the Beast for 19 mana. This means you can shoot this round. But what does this do? There are many builds today that like to “turtle”, that is, to stay in their corner and build up their resources until a point in which they can unleash a larger attack without having to worry about resource depletion. A lot of wizard builds these days depend on this turtling method. By starting aggressive during the second round, you are forcing them to react. To either come out of their shell, or die. Because with Watchtower, you are rolling 5 dice in their starting corner.

Now, as soon as this round is over, one of two things is going to happen:

1.   They are going to try and control/destroy your Sniper.

2.   They are going to go hyper aggressive on you.

If one happens, there’s a few different things you can do, depending on where they are attacking from. If they try to attack you from the other side of the Near center, Wall of Steel. Due to the Watchtower giving the Sniper the “Indirect” ability, you can now smash face with a wall up. If they start attacking from the side instead of the near center, I tanglevine em. I might save the vine for when you have initiative next turn, in order to Jinx them, but that is up to you. If they ever happen to get in the same zone as you, you are in a fantastic position to Force Push Wall of thorns them, which then lets you shoot with the sniper. Oh the synergies!

If they go hyper aggressive on me, then I like to start to put them on the back foot by using the next turn to drop a mana crystal and a hawkeye on myself. This is to bluff that I’m on the back foot myself and that I have turned to reacting (poorly, I might add, like reacting with a mana crystal is a good move!). The next turn I can then double hurl boulder for 16 dice of damage, followed by a Grimson shot for either 5/6/7 damage. If I do this for two turns in a row followed by a force push, wall of thorns, they are dead, as that’s an average of 52 damage. Over the span of three rounds.

So what are the other cards for then? Well, there will be times when your opponent does something more aggressive than you. I know, I know. Or they will kill your sniper in one shot with a boulder. Or some other craziness. When that happens, I incorporate the Battle forge Iron Bear control strategy. You can also use this as your opener if you want. Dropping a battle forge in the adjacent zone to your sniper, and then dropping a crystal. Next turn, I cast Sunfire with the forge, turning on my shield, and casting a second crystal. This sets you up in a monster control position, and from then on it’s only a matter of casting and using your golems with charge and tele to smash face. You also have Grizzly to work with, who is an effective, and crazy damage dealer. If you find that they can’t deal with flying very well, grizzly+wings is the way to go.

I guess I want to end by saying that this book over its various iterations has won over 40 games against skilled, experienced, and apt opponents. The book punishes the opponent for making mistakes, but be warned, as can also be unforgiving in your doings as well. This book, more than any other I have seen, commands that you think a few rounds ahead, and to really think about what your opponent is doing. I highly encourage you to try this book out and see what it can do!



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Evolusi

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2013, 11:14:49 PM »
Dude! So the book is great, and I actually had adapted it to a Warlord build, just because I like to take an idea and sort of make it mine since I don't like just straight up copying people.

It worked really well except

A) Since I built it Warlord I really had to cut out with a lot of Arcane which included 2 teleports and a teleport trap
B) Channeling sucks
C) played against a really nice Beastmaster

It basically came down to me rolling for the last 4 damage and on 11 dice (Warlord melee and Grimson) I rolled 1 on the Grimson and a 2 (he had 2 armor)

I had filled the space with what I thought would be good filler which was 6 goblin grunts and a standard bearer along with a couple pieces of equipment which I thought would let me rely less on the separate command spells and other arcane spells, but his pet grizzly tore through them like tissue paper.

By the time i had my 2 golems out guarding, he rolled in 6 critical 2 separate instances with 7 dice. It was retarded.

Anyway, gonna take it back to the wizard and give it a go tomorrow >.<

I might try Warlord one more time, but I feel like I'm just gimping myself for no reason.

The Dude

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2013, 01:11:07 PM »
If you try the Warlord mate, DON'T include them golems. They are a waste of a full action that die to getting breathed on too heavy. With the Warlord you want to be going more a creature control route. Use your grimson for area control, and then Thorg for creature control. I would still include a one of Teleport, as it's desperately necessary some games. Don't focus on the Warlord's ability to melee. It's a Trap, said Ackbar. he just doesn't have enough ways to protect himself, nor does his attacks do anything particularly nasty, except roll high. The one thing I would pack a few of is dissolves. And you will have to waste spellbook points on Dispels. It's a necessary evil (people always think they can bring out whatever enchantment they want around the Warlord without fear, show them the truth).

I wish I could say it was as easy as taking the Wizard out and adding the Warlord, but the Warlord really does have a much different playstyle than any other mage I've played.

Bon chance to ya!

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Wildhorn

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2013, 08:14:36 AM »
What do you do against a Teleport + Wall?

Speedbump858

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2013, 04:08:37 AM »
The Highly Calibrated Wizard

4 Hurl Boulder (8)
1 Hail of Stone (2)
1 Arc Lightning (2)
2 Iron Golem (6)
1 Grimson Deadeye, Sniper (8)
1 Steelclaw Grizzly (8)
1 Sunfire Amulet (4)
1 Elemental Cloak (1)
1 Mage Wand (2)
1 Dragonscale Hauberk (2)
1 Regrowth Belt (2)
1 Leather Boots (1)
1 Leather Gloves (1)
1 Battle Forge (4)
1 Wall of Steel (2)
1 Wizard’s Tower (2)
2 Mana Crystal (2)
1 Wall of Thorns (1)
1 Archer’s Watchtower (2)
3 Tanglevine (6)
1 Block (2)
2 Jinx (2)
1 Teleport Trap (1)
2 Nullify (2)
1 Turn to Stone (3)
1 Hawkeye (2)
1 Eagle Wings (4)
1 Magebane (2)
1 Ghoul Rot (4)
1 Rouse the Beast (2)
2 Sniper Shot (2)
2 Dissolve (4)
1 Purge Magic (3)
2 Dispel (2)
2 Charge (4)
2 Seeking Dispel (2)
1 Force Push (2)
2 Battle Fury (4)
4 Teleport (8)

This is all for a total of 120 points.


A few small errors in calculations.  If you go by your totals, this comes out to 121 points.  Actually this Spellbook is 124 points.

1x Wall of Thorns costs a Earth Wizard 2 points (you listed 1)
2x Sniper Shot costs a Earth Wizard 4 points (you listed 2)


Hope you will make some adjustments.


Zilfalon

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2015, 04:26:45 AM »
I tried your praised deck once. Lost uncontested actually.

Why? Because Forcemaster, thats why. This deck relies on Grimson to do the damage and draw the enemy out.
I could not do so, since the first two attacks were avoided while the Forcemaster kept casting Psylocks.
Turns out, those 3 Psylocks had Force pushs on them, so they made Grimson get pushed out of the zone to the back and then smack his head against the arena over and over again. He almost got one Psylock down however.
The Wizard then, pretty defensless, as the Wizards tower got one shotted by a Force Hammer right after casting.

By then the Wizard was already cornered by 2 Psylocks with Force pushes and the Forcemaster himself.
All this pushing screwed up the game for me. Grimson didnt get the bonus from the archers watchtower after being pushed.

Just fyi: I took out 2 of 4 Teleports to make the deck cost 120, as this was the quickest solution that time.

I would certainly try to have more options - or the forcemaster is the natural enemy against this deck due to the evasion. What would you say?

Obsidian Soul

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2015, 01:55:39 PM »
I would suggest replacing the Iron Golems with Dissolving Jellies.  Dissolving Jellies are immune to acid, dealing acid damage, are uncontainable, are resilient and are capable of reconstructing themselves, which make them all around superior to an Iron Golem.  If you want crowd control, replace Grimson with two Medusa Archers.  If you want to hit hard, replace the Steelclaw Grizzly with a couple of Blue Gremlins with Lion Savagery. 

Schwenkgott

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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2015, 03:29:23 PM »
Crimson is too vulnerable, when summoned as first creature. You should first summon other creatures, to protect your mage or attack/hinder the enemy. When the fight starts, you can summon Crimson (or Ludwig) with a Rouse the Beast to do the heavy hits. Take a Force Push in your prepared cards in the next rounds to ensure that your Archer is able to fire at what ever you wish.
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Re: The Highly Calibrated Wizard
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2015, 01:30:27 PM »
I would suggest to add a date of the deck in the overview.

After rethinking this, this deck isnt working today anymore. Intercept, Forcemaster, Reflex Boots are just some of many ways to invalidate this decks concept.